Russian Sailors Rescued from Trapped AS-28 Mini Submarine

Introduction.
A Russian AS -28 Mini-Submarine, with a crew of seven became snagged on Friday the 5th. of August 2005, by an undersea cable, and lays trapped at a depth of 200 metres on the floor of the Pacific Ocean. It is about 10 miles off shore in the area of the Kamachtka Peninsula. The crew have oxygen to support them only until next Monday.

Drawing of AS-28 Russian Mini Sub. I question the stated diving depth of 3,000 feet, it is reported elsewhere as 1,640 feet

Drawing of AS-28 Russian Mini Sub.
I question the stated diving depth of 3,000 feet, it is reported elsewhere as 1,640 feet

Rescue Teams on their way.
British and US rescue teams are on their way in a desperate attempt to both release the snared Submarine and rescue all its crew members. Four transport planes carrying Scorpio, and Super Scorpio unmanned submersibles which can operate at great depths and are armed with cable cutting equipment have taken off for the accident scene.

Russian crews have attached cables to the stricken submarine hoping to be able to pull her free, alas to no avail. Shades of the Kursk disaster five years ago. This new drama of a sunken submarine in trouble, calls to mind the tragedy of the Kursk some five years ago, when 118 Russian sailors died because the Russian Navy and authorities were too tardy in calling for International help.

One must also ponder on why the Russian Navy still has not learned from that saga, and provided adequate rescue equipment for their own Submarine Fleet. However, on this occasion, help has been sought at once, it now remains to be seen if time will allow a rescue to take place.

A US plane loads rescue equipment to go to the aid of trapped Russian Mini Submarine with a crew of seven.

A US plane loads rescue equipment to go to the aid of trapped Russian Mini Submarine with a crew of seven

Description of this Mini-Sub.
This trapped AS-28 Mini-Submarine was built in 1989, is about 44 feet long, with a height of 19 feet, and carries a commanding officer with a crew of six. Her maximum diving depth is reported as 1,640 feet.

Sunday the 7th. of August 2005, SUCCESS.
Great news! the seven man crew from the trapped Russian Mini-Submarine have all been rescued. A British Remote Control Vehicle cut away the under water cable snagging the submarine to release it, and allow it to surface. The crew were able to open the deck hatch to all emerge safely. They have now been taken to the mainland and went off to hospital for medical check ups after their ordeal.

Success! all seven crew rescued from Russian Mini-Sub on Sunday the 7th. of August 2005

Success! all seven crew rescued from Russian Mini-Sub on Sunday the 7th. of August 2005

Their Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Vyacheslav Mileshevsky as he landed, saluted, offered a slight smile, and said he was fine.

The Commander of the Russian Min-Submarine after his dramatic rescue

The Commander of the Russian Min-Submarine after his dramatic rescue

Conclusion.
Thankfully, a fast International response by rescue teams from Britain and the United States prevailed on this occasion, and no Russian Sailors paid the ultimate price. But their survival was not made possible by the actions of their own authorities, who need to be questioned on the future provision of rescue craft for Russian Submariners, who find themselves in accident situations due to their hazardous occupation.

Russian AS-28 Min-Sub on the surface after being cut free from entangling cables 200 metres down in the Pacific Ocean. All 7 crew are safe, Sunday the 7th. of August 2005

Russian AS-28 Min-Sub on the surface after being cut free from entangling cables 200 metres down in the Pacific Ocean.
All 7 crew are safe, Sunday the 7th. of August 2005


   

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